Colette Bryce, Kit Fan and Martin Kratz, with music from the Kell Wind Trio: 19 January 2019

Free event at the Whitworth Art Gallery. All welcome.

Colette Bryce

Colette Bryce is the author of four collections with Picador. Her latest, The Whole & Rain-domed Universe (2014), which draws on her experience of growing up in Derry during the Troubles, was shortlisted for the Forward and Costa prizes, and received a Ewart-Biggs Award in memory of Seamus Heaney. Selected Poems (2017) won the Pigott Prize for poetry at Listowel 2018. Colette is a freelance writer and former editor of Poetry London magazine. She lives in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Kit Fan

Born in Hong Kong, Kit Fan moved to Britain at the age of 21. His first book Paper Scissors Stone won the inaugural HKU International Poetry Prize.  His second collection As Slow As Possible is a Poetry Books Society Recommendation and chosen by the Guardian as one of the 50 biggest books in Autumn 2018.  He was shortlisted for the 2017 TLS Mick Imlah Poetry Prize. He was also shortlisted for the Guardian 4th Estate BAME Short Story Prize consecutively in 2017 for ‘Duty Free’ and in 2018 for ‘A City of Culture’.  He won a 2018 Northern Writers Award for Diamond Hill, a novel in progresswww.kitfan.net

Martin Kratz

IMG_0225.JPGMartin Kratz’s first pamphlet, A Skeleton’s Progress, was published in 2018 by Poetry Salzburg. He is co-editor of Mount London by Penned in the Margins (2014), a book of essays that explores hills and other elevations in the capital. His poem ‘The Man Who Walked Through Walls’ was Highly Commended for the Forward Prize in 2014. He translates from the German including, most recently, the poetry of Berthold Brecht and Nelly Sachs.

Kell Wind Trio

The Kell Wind Trio has gained a reputation for giving lively and informative concerts which include music of many different styles and genres – from music of the Baroque to accessible music from the 20thand 21stcenturies. The Kell Wind Trio is named after the pioneering English instrumentalist Reginald Kell, who was the first clarinettist to use vibrato in orchestral concerts.

Alastair Roberts plays principal flute regularly with a number of orchestras in the Manchester area including the Wilmslow Symphony Orchestra and the Cheshire Sinfonia.  He is a member of several chamber groups that perform regularly throughout the North West of England including the Telemann Baroque Ensemble.

Geoffrey Smith has been principal clarinet of the Stockport Symphony Orchestra since its inception in 1975. He also plays regularly as principal clarinet with both Wilmslow Symphony Orchestra and Cheshire Sinfonia. He has also appeared many times as soloist with these and other orchestras.

Ian Harvey was a Junior Exhibitioner at London’s Royal Academy of Music. His musical commitments include the position of principal bassoon with the Stockport Symphony Orchestra.  He runs his own business repairing woodwind instruments.

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Workshop with Colette Bryce: 19 January 2019

Workshop with Colette Bryce on Saturday 19 January 2019, 10.30-12.30 at the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester. The fee is £20, please email davidborrott@btinternet.com for details of how to pay. Participants will be invited to submit a poem to Colette before the workshop and feedback will be given during the session.

Colette Bryce

Colette Bryce is the author of four collections with Picador. Her latest, The Whole & Rain-domed Universe (2014), which draws on her experience of growing up in Derry during the Troubles, was shortlisted for the Forward and Costa prizes, and received a Ewart-Biggs Award in memory of Seamus Heaney. Selected Poems (2017) won the Pigott Prize for poetry at Listowel 2018. Colette is a freelance writer and former editor of Poetry London magazine. She lives in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Migrations Commission: new work from Sophie Herxheimer, Kapka Kassabova & Tariq Latif

Sophie Herxheimer

For Gulwali Passarlay

Small Gulwali hadn’t seen the sea,
though gulls hijacked his name.
He’d learned to shepherd in the snows of home,
bossing his aunties: cover your heads
for shame! Set out a fledgeling
fundamentalist, till harsh months
pecked at him and beat their wings.
Rare lights redrew the map: a kind old face,
a cosy stew: hope’s landmarks.
Not drowned! But washed to lucky Bolton.
He carried their Olympic Torch.
He carries his own flame now.
His new aunt-teachers on the film clip say:
Gulwali’s going to be prime minister one day.

Some background on the poem from Sophie:
The little sonnet was inspired by meeting and sharing a platform with refugee campaigner (and former child refugee) Gulwali Passarlay at a book festival, and then reading about his experiences of coming to Britain, in his book The Lightless Sky.

Watch Sophie reading the poem here

image1.jpeg

Sophie Herxheimer is an artist and a poet. Her work has been shown at her local allotments and at Tate Modern, at The National Portrait Gallery and on a 48 metre hoarding along the seafront in Margate. She has held residencies for The Thames Festival, The National Maritime Museum, Museum of Liverpool, Transport for London, the Arvon Foundation and Winchester Poetry Festival amongst many others. A current commission is making new portraits of 26 essential poets for The Poetry Foundation in Chicago. Previous projects include creating a 300 metre linen tablecloth for a public banquet on Southwark Bridge, sculpting a Mrs Beeton shaped concrete poem sited next to her grave, making a giant book in collaboration with a rural community in the midlands, devising the visuals for National Poetry Day, creating the colour palette for CBeebies hit The Night Garden. She has an ongoing project of collecting stories from members of the public by listening and drawing with people one to one. Recent publications include Your Candle Accompanies the Sun (Henningham Family Press 2017) and Velkom to Inklandt, (Short Books 2017) which was selected as an Observer poetry book of the month and a Sunday Times book of the year. New out is a collaborative book with Chris McCabe, responding to William Blake: The Practical Visionary (Hercules Editions, 2018).

Next projects include a poetry collection in 2019, Sixty Lovers to Make and Do, with Henningham Family Press, and an art residency in Berkeley, California.

(photo credit: Judith Palmer)

Kapka Kassabova

Cold Water

At the beginning was the mountain.
Inside the mountain – a spring that later would be called ‘Cold Water’.
But for the first million years or so, it had no name
and neither did the bear, jackal, wolf
that came to drink, their eyes like stars
in the humanless Cosmos, nor the storks that would briefly eclipse
the autumn skies of local childhoods.

One day, the first among us would arrive from Africa,
Arabia, across the strait the Greeks would later name the Bosphorus.
A child would bend down and drink
from Cold Water. The glaciers would be yet to come
to the north, creatures to disappear.
Thirty thousand years would pass, we would gather
and hunt, obscure and fruitful in the mountain.

Then others would arrive, their feet beating anew the old path,
and the black glistening buffalo of future centuries
who won’t stop but walk uphill on their knees
when the columns of refugees would pass
between one war and another, their lives packed in a cart.
A barbed fence would rise near Cold Water, one day,
to cut the mountain in two.

Cold Water would remain in no man’s land.
The Greeks would be long gone, the barbed fence later sold for scrap.
One day a child would bend down and drink,
his mother too, their lives packed in a rucksack, tired
as if they’d walked millennia, climbed mountains
on their knees, the smuggler urging them on with the others
because the guards are armed,
history’s bomb is ticking, there is no way back.

At Cold Water, someone built a stone bed for the stream.
Storks eclipse the sky to Africa, the glaciers
are melting again, creatures disappearing,
continents spill their people into the sea,
and though our bones are dust, we are still walking.
It takes forever to arrive once you have left.
Our consolation is to bend down and drink
the Cold Water of eternity: everything begins with a spring.

Some background on the poem from Kapka:
• ‘Cold Water is a real place – the locals still call it by its old Greek name, Krio nero (‘cold water’). It’s on the Bulgarian side of the border with Turkey, in a sort of no man’s land where only shepherds and hikers go now, but it is simultaneously positioned along a much-trodden mountain path that has seen many an exodus/ influx of peoples, fugitives in both directions (towards Turkey during the Cold War, for example). The latest are the refugees coming from the Middle East – this time from Turkey and into ‘Europe’.’
• ‘Cold Water is a mountain spring along the main migration route into Europe and that migration along there has never really stopped, since the beginning of the peopling of Europe.’
• ‘Here is an image of it. As you can see, the latest basin was built in 1971, complete with a Soviet star. But there has always been a spring here, and the name Cold Water long precedes its current look.

Watch Kapka reading the poem here

Kapka Kassabova is the author of Border (2017) which has just won the British Academy’s Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanading, and was also the winner of the Saltire Book of the Year, the Edward Stanford Book of the Year, and the Highland Book Prize. She is a poet and the author of two previous books of narrative non-fiction: Street Without a Name and Twelve Minutes of Love. Raised in Bulgaria and educated in New Zealand, she now lives in the Highlands of Scotland. (photo credit TD).

Tariq Latif

I am cut in three

my flesh – scattered
to opposite parts of the world.

The British Raj
divided my country
with the stroke of a pen
and we had to move.

I reasoned with my sons
“the soil will be the same,
the seasons will not change,
our land is one continuous plane.”

But they raged like crazed tigers.

And they uprooted with such anger
and bitterness I knew
something would give – but this
oh Akal Purakh not this –

Param, Samir and Manan came to me,
after just one season following the terrible
move, with their passports and visas.
Australia. England. Canada.

I wanted to tear my chemise,
throw off my turban and cut my hair
but I held myself though in my heart I cried.

“Don’t be deceived by the five thieves,”
I said. “Where ever you find yourself
be sure to build a Gurdwara.”

Then I gouged my sword
into the Punjabi soil
and made a thick cut.
“A trunk,” I said and I marked
three branches for my three boys.

“Remember your roots, keep
your faith and go in peace.”
I hugged them one by one
and then they were gone
like jet smoke in the sky.

And the tiger in me lay down to die.

Watch Tariq reading the poem here

ImageTariq Latif has been writing poetry for over 30 years. He has 3 full collections: Skimming the Soul; Ministers Garden and The Punjabi Weddings. His pamphlet Smithereens was short listed for the Callum MacDonald Prize. All are Arc publications. He is currently putting together his fourth collection provisionally titled Refugees.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Liz Berry, with commissions from Sophie Herxheimer, Kapka Kassabova & Tariq Latif; music from Archipelago: 17 November 2018

Free event at the Whitworth Art Gallery. All welcome.

Liz Berry

Liz Berry’s first book of poems, Black Country (Chatto 2014), described as a ‘sooty, soaring hymn to her native West Midlands’ (Guardian) was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, received a Somerset Maugham Award and won the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Award and Forward Prize for Best First Collection 2014. Her new pamphlet is The Republic of Motherhood (Chatto 2018) the title poem has won the Forward Prize for Best Single Poem 2018.

This event will also feature commissioned poems on the subject of ‘Migrations’ from:

Sophie Herxheimer

image1.jpegSophie Herxheimer is an artist and a poet. Her work has been shown at her local allotments and at Tate Modern, at The National Portrait Gallery and on a 48 metre hoarding along the seafront in Margate. She has held residencies for The Thames Festival, The National Maritime Museum, Museum of Liverpool, Transport for London, the Arvon Foundation and Winchester Poetry Festival amongst many others. A current commission is making new portraits of 26 essential poets for The Poetry Foundation in Chicago. Previous projects include creating a 300 metre linen tablecloth for a public banquet on Southwark Bridge, sculpting a Mrs Beeton shaped concrete poem sited next to her grave, making a giant book in collaboration with a rural community in the midlands, devising the visuals for National Poetry Day, creating the colour palette for CBeebies hit The Night Garden. She has an ongoing project of collecting stories from members of the public by listening and drawing with people one to one. Recent publications include Your Candle Accompanies the Sun (Henningham Family Press 2017) and Velkom to Inklandt, (Short Books 2017) which was selected as an Observer poetry book of the month and a Sunday Times book of the year. New out is a collaborative book with Chris McCabe, responding to William Blake: The Practical Visionary (Hercules Editions, 2018).

Next projects include a poetry collection in 2019, Sixty Lovers to Make and Do, with Henningham Family Press, and an art residency in Berkeley, California.

(photo credit: Judith Palmer)

Kapka Kassabova

Kapka Kassabova is the author of Border (2017) which has just won the British Academy’s Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanading, and was also the winner of the Saltire Book of the Year, the Edward Stanford Book of the Year, and the Highland Book Prize. She is a poet and the author of two previous books of narrative non-fiction: Street Without a Name and Twelve Minutes of Love. Raised in Bulgaria and educated in New Zealand, she now lives in the Highlands of Scotland. (photo credit TD).

Tariq Latif

ImageTariq Latif has been writing poetry for over 30 years. He has 3 full collections: Skimming the Soul; Ministers Garden and The Punjabi Weddings. His pamphlet Smithereens was short listed for the Callum MacDonald Prize. All are Arc publications. He is currently putting together his fourth collection provisionally titled Refugees.

Archipelago

Archipelago are an award winning garage-jazz trio from Newcastle upon Tyne. Playing original, genre crossing material, their music fuses jazz, alt-rock and free improvisation to name a few, taking inspiration from musicians as diverse as Don Cherry, Morphine and Joni Mitchell. Since releasing their debut LP ‘Weightless’ in 2017, Archipelago have received national airplay (Late Junction, Jazz on 3), been selected for Jazz North’s ‘Northern Line’ touring scheme, and received a ‘Peter Whittingham Development Award’ from Help Musicians UK with which they are running ‘BETWEEN WAVES’; a collaborative residency-gig series to make new music with female UK artists.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Sean O’Brien and Deryn Rees-Jones with music from the Basilisk Duo: 6 October 2018

This is our annual collaboration with Manchester Literature Festival. Poets Sean O’Brien and Deryn Rees-Jones and RNCM’s The Basilisk Duo, saxophonists Freya Chambers and Simeon Evans will perform at the Whitworth Art Gallery on Saturday 6 October, 2.30-4.00. The event is free but we would advise you reserve a ticket at http://www.manchesterliteraturefestival.co.uk/events/sean-o-basilisk-duo-38399

Sean O’Brien

Photo credit Gerry Wardle

Sean O’Brien’s ninth poetry collection is, Europa (2018). His Collected Poems appeared in 2012. His work has received various awards including the T.S. Eliot, Forward and Roehampton Poetry prizes. In 2016 his second novel, Once Again Assembled Here, was published, followed in 2018 by his second collection of short stories, Quartier Perdu. He is a critic, translator, editor, playwright, novelist, broadcaster, experienced writing tutor and mentor. He lives in Newcastle, is a Professor of Creative Writing at Newcastle University and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

 

Deryn Rees-Jones

Deryn Rees-Jones’s selected poems,  What It’s Like to Be Alive, was published by Seren in 2016 and was a PBS Special Commendation. Her new  book  of poems,  Erato, is due from Seren in 2019, and her study of the artist Paula Rego will be published by Thames & Hudson in 2020. She is the editor of Pavilion a poetry press and teaches at the University of Liverpool where she is Professor of Poetry.

With music from The Basilisk Duo, Freya Chambers and Simeon Evans from the Royal Northern College of Music

Basilisk Duo

Freya Chambers  bass clarinet and tenor saxophone

Simeon Evans  baritone and bass saxophone

 The Basilisk duo is a recently formed ensemble from the RNCM in Manchester. They play a wide variety of contemporary music using mainly low wind instruments and electronics, characterised most by their love of music with an infectious rhythmic drive and their generally low frequency tomfoolery.

Simeon specialises mainly in baritone and bass saxophone music, studying with Carl Raven and Rob Buckland. He has recently been part of a number of notable projects, including multiple appearances with the RNCM big band, international concerts with the Carnelian Saxophone Quartet (which both he and Freya form the lower half of) and a nationally televised concert series over New Year with the Netherlands Wind Ensemble in Amsterdam.

Freya specialises in bass clarinet and tenor saxophone, playing both in the duo. She studies saxophone with Rob Buckland and Andy Scott, clarinet with Linda Merrick and bass clarinet with Sarah Watts. She has achieved a number of successes on both saxophone and clarinet, including performing with the RNCM symphony orchestra at Bridgewater hall, multiple appearances with the Piccadilly Symphony Orchestra and being selected to perform with the BBC Youth Ensemble at the last night of the proms in the Summer of 2016.

The Basilisk Duo appears by kind permission of the RNCM.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

John Glenday, Ben Wilkinson, Keshia Starrett with music from Chris Davies and Andrew Mucha: 15 September 2018

Free event at the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester all welcome, Saturday 15 September, 2.30-4.00.

John Glenday

John Glenday is the author of four poetry collections. The Apple Ghost (Peterloo Poets 1989) won a Scottish Arts Council Book Award and Undark, was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation for 1995. His third collection, Grain (Picador, 2009) was also a PBS Recommendation and shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award and the Griffin International Poetry Prize. His fourth collection, The Golden Mean, (Picador 2015) won the Roehampton Poetry Prize and was shortlisted for the Saltire Scottish Poetry Book of the Year.

 

 

Ben Wilkinson

Ben was born in Staffordshire and now lives in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. In 2014 he won the Poetry Business Competition and a Northern Writers’ Award, and in 2015 he was awarded a writers’ grant from Arts Council England. He is a keen distance runner, football fan, and he writes criticism for The Guardian. He lectures at the University of Bolton. Way More Than Luck (Seren Books, 2018) is his debut full-length book of poems.

Keshia Starrett

Keshia Starrett is an Irish writer living in Leeds. She is the Poetry Rivals 2016 Slam Champion and her poetry pamphlet Hysterical was published in November 2017. Her writing has appeared in various magazines and anthologies, including Abridged, The Interpreter’s House, The Honest Ulsterman, and Ink, Sweat & Tears. She has an MA Creative Writing from the University of Manchester and is currently a PhD student at Leeds Beckett University. She regularly performs at spoken word events across Britain and Ireland.

With music from Chris Davies and Andrew Mucha

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Workshop with John Glenday: Saturday 15 September 2018

Our next event is a workshop with John Glenday on the morning of Saturday 15 September 2018, 10.30-12.30 at the Whitworth Art Gallery. The fee for the workshop is £20. Please email davidborrot@btinternet.com to reserve a place.

John Glenday

John Glenday is the author of four poetry collections. The Apple Ghost (Peterloo Poets 1989) won a Scottish Arts Council Book Award and Undark, was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation for 1995. His third collection, Grain (Picador, 2009) was also a PBS Recommendation and shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award and the Griffin International Poetry Prize. His fourth collection, The Golden Mean, (Picador 2015) won the Roehampton Poetry Prize and was shortlisted for the Saltire Scottish Poetry Book of the Year.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment